John Gilbert

John Gilbert

Professor
Computer Science
805-893-7512
gilbert [at] cs [dot] ucsb [dot] edu

Institute Role
Member of Computing Solutions Group

Role in Affiliated Centers
Member of the Greenscale Center for Energy-Efficient Computing

Research
John Gilbert’s research interests include high-performance computing, combinatorial scientific computing, numerical linear algebra, sparse matrix methods, computation with large graphs, mathematical software, and computational science and engineering. Gilbert applies his research in the area of cooling technologies for energy-efficient computational facilities by developing efficient numerical algorithms for computationally modeling airflows on supercomputers.

Biography
John Gilbert received his Ph.D. in Computer Science at Stanford in 1981. From 1981 to 1988, he was on the Computer Science faculty at Cornell University. In 1988 he moved to Xerox PARC, where he performed and directed research in parallel computing, computational geometry, languages and compilers for high-performance computing, and mathematical algorithms and software. In 1997 he founded the Computation and Matter Area at PARC, whose projects included distributed data analysis for collaborating sensors, meso-scale MEMS for active surfaces, and modular robotics. In 2002, Gilbert joined the Computer Science Department and the Computational Science and Engineering Program at UC Santa Barbara. Gilbert has served on the Council of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, has chaired the SIAM Activity Group on Supercomputing and the ACM Special Interest Group on Numerical Mathematics, and has served as editor for several journals in computational science and applied mathematics. Gilbert has authored or co-authored over 100 publications and has been granted 4 patents.

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