Michael Chabinyc

Michael Chabinyc

Associate Profesor
Materials
805-893-4042
mchabinyc [at] engineering [dot] ucsb [dot] edu

Institute Role
Member of Production & Storage Solutions Group

Role in Affiliated Centers
Member of the Center for Polymers and Organic Solids, the Center for Energy Efficient Materials and the Mitsubishi Chemical Center for Advanced Materials

Research
Michael Chabinyc studies materials for flexible electronics and energy storage and conversion. Specific interests include hybrid organic devices for energy storage and characterization of the electrical and morphological characteristics of organic semiconductors in thin film transistors and photovoltaics. Chabinyc studies the nature of organic interfaces in thin films using a variety of techniques including x-ray scattering, scanning probe microscopies, and electrical transport measurements.

Biography
Michael Chabinyc received a B.S. degree from the University of Dayton (1994) and a Ph.D. in Chemistry from Stanford University (1999) where he studied gas-phase ion-molecule reactions using ion cyclotron resonance spectrometry. Subsequently, he was an N.I.H. post-doctoral fellow at Harvard University (2001) where he worked on bio-microfluidic systems, molecular electronics, and nanofabrication using soft lithography. He then moved to Palo Alto Research Center (formerly Xerox PARC) where he was a member of research staff from 2001-2005 and a senior member of research staff from 2005-2008 in the Electronic Materials and Devices Laboratory. While at PARC, he developed novel fabrication methods for flexible, large-area electronics such as displays and researched organic electronic devices.  Chabinyc joined UC Santa Barbara in 2008 and is currently an Associate Professor in the Materials Department.

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